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The Wright Brothers Day

Hi everyone hope you are all okay. It is not long now until Christmas day, it is almost upon us, only 8 shopping days left, so I hope you have managed to do all your Christmas shopping, as next week will just be horrendous.

Today’s post is about real life brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright also known as the Wright brothers. They were two American Aviation Pioneers who had incredible vision and enormous talent for designing and creating their inventions. They invented the first successful airplane one hundred and seventeen years ago today.

Wilbur and Orville: The Early Years

Orville Wright 4 years and 9 months of age and Wilbur Wright 9 years of age

Wilbur (16 April 1867) and Orville (19 August 1871) were born to parents Milton and Susan Koerner. They belonged to a warm and loving family that would encourage learning, and to always keep on doing. Their family consisted of older brothers Rauchlin and Lorin, and younger sister Katharine.

The Toy Helicopter

Their mother Susan was the daughter of a wagon maker, who made toys for her children and always encouraged their curiosity. Whilst their father Milton was a bishop of the United Brethren Church, which often took him away from home on church business. But he would always keep in contact with his family by writing hundreds of letters home, and would often bring presents from his many trips away, and that gave the children a look at the world beyond their horizon. In 1878, one of the gifts he brought home was a rubber band powered helicopter, the young boys immediately began to build copies of it and would sell them to their friends including handmade kites. Wilbur and Orville always did things together ever since they were small.

The Wright Brothers Helicopter

In 1884, Bishop Wright decided to move his family to Dayton, Ohio, which was the political center of the United Brethren Church. Around the same time, his wife Susan fell ill with tuberculosis. Just out of high school Wilbur put aside going to college, so that he could nurse his sick mother, while Orville started to lose interest in school, instead he learned all he could about the printing business. Their mother Susan Wright’s health declined and died by summer of 1889, and that same year Orville decided to drop out of high school to open his first print shop.

Their Career Path

The Printing Business

In 1890, Wilbur went to join Orville in the printing business, serving as editor for The West Side News, a newspaper that went out weekly to their west Dayton neighborhood. It was a modestly successful business, and to give its residence more, they began a daily, and evening item, in 1891. However, it took a lot of work to keep up with the larger and more established daily newspapers, so after a few months they simply went back to being job printers.

The Bicycle Process
Original Wright Brothers Bicycle

By 1894, the brothers were caught up in the bicycling craze that had swept the nation. They used the money they had got from their printing trade and used it to open their first bicycle shop, at first they just sold and repaired bikes. This soon grew in to a full-time business, and by 1896 they started to build their own brand of bikes. The Wright Cycle Company would soon make a handsome profit. The brothers cared little about money, and by now they were already thinking about trading their wheels for wings.

It was their experiences with bicycles that helped them in their investigation of flight. They would later go on to use their knowledge that they had learned from they’re bicycle business in their airplanes: wheel hubs, chains, ball bearings, sprockets and spoke wire. They would use their experience as cyclist to help with balancing and controlling their aircraft.

The Invention Of The Airplane

In 1896, the newspapers were filled with stories of flying machines. Wilbur and Orville had noticed that these archaic aircraft lacked suitable controls. They would start to wonder how a pilot would balance an airplane in the air just as a biker would balance his bike when cycling on the road. By 1899 The Wright Brothers were so eager to control an aircraft that they devised a simple system plan that twisted or warped the wings of a biplane, which causes it to roll right then left and then restoring it back to level flight. Wilbur and Orville came up with this idea by watching birds in flight. They tested this system by using a kite, then a series of gliders.

Their First Successful Airplane

They made their first test flights at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, on the shores of the Atlantic, it’s a place where the strong winds had helped to launch the gliders and it helped that you had the soft sand to cushion yourself when you crashed. Their first two gliders that had flown in 1900 and 1901 were not provided with enough lift, nor were they fully controllable. So during the winter of 1901 and 1902 the brothers built a wind tunnel and organized many experiments on them to determine the best shape for an airplane to stay up in the air. This empowered them to build a glider with enough lift, and enabled them to concentrate on the problem of control. It wasn’t until towards the end of 1902 flying season, that their third glider became the first fully controllable aircraft, with roll, pinch and yaw controls.

It was during the winter of 1902 and 1903, with the help of their mechanic Charlie Taylor, the Wrights finally got to design and build a  gasoline engine that was light enough to propel an airplane. They also designed the first true airplane propellers and build a new powered aircraft. Back at Kitty Hawk, Wilbur and Orville had found themselves in a race. Samuel P. Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, had also built a powered aircraft that was designed after a small unmanned “aerodrome” that he had flown successfully in 1896. To add to their frustrations, the brothers kept being delayed by problems with the propeller shafts as well as the weather, which gave Langley time to check the aircraft twice in late 1903. Both experiments floundered badly, and then Langley left the field to the Wright Brothers. On December 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first assisted, controlled flights in a powered aircraft.

Orville’s Dedication To His Brother

On 30 May, 1912, Wilbur died aged 45 of typhoid fever, which he had contracted after eating some oysters at a hotel in Boston. Orville is the shyer one and less worldly, was devastated by his brothers’ death that he had made the decision to sell the Wright Company as it was too much to bear without Wilbur being there, and made around $1.5 million in the process. He spent the rest of his life tinkering in his workshop, and hanging out with his family and protecting the Wright family legacy.

By the time of Orville’s’ death on 30 January, 1948 he had seen his brother’s invention transform transportation, culture war forever. And to think all there work that they had created, started by two small boys and one toy helicopter and there self believe in each other.

 The Wright brothers are from a mere minority, that were among the blessed few who could combine mechanical ability with intelligence in roughly equal amounts. The brother’s biographer Fred Howard had once wrote. “One man with this dual gift is exceptional. Two such men whose lives and fortunes are closely linked, can raise this combination of qualities to a point where their combined talents are akin to genius.”

22 Amazing Facts

  • Milton and Susan Wright had seven children, that included a set of twins Otis and Ida, but tragically the twins died. Otis was born first and managed to live for 1 week and 6 days and Ida managed 2 weeks and 4 days.
  • Wilbur was the third child and Orville the sixth
  • A toy piqued their passion from an early age.
  • In 1878, when Wilbur was 11 and Orville 7, their father gave them a helicopter-like toy to share. It was based on an invention by Alphonse Pénaud and was made of paper, bamboo and cork with a rubber band to twirl the motor. The brothers later said this toy was the beginning of an obsession with flying machines.
  • Their genius was genetic as their mother, Sarah, was very mechanically inclined. Her own father was a carriage maker, and she spent a lot of time in his shop. She made her own appliances as well as toys for her children. The Wright brothers consulted their mother’s advice regularly as they designed their own machines.
  • The brothers shared such a close bond…  Even though the Wright brothers weren’t twins, they certainly lived like they were. They worked side by side six days a week, and shared the same residence, meals, and bank account. They also enjoyed mutual interests, like music and cooking. Neither brother ever married. Orville said it was Wilbur’s job, as the older sibling, to get hitched first. Meanwhile, Wilbur said he “had no time for a wife.” In any case, the two became successful businessmen, scoring aviation contracts both domestically and abroad.
  • One of the newspapers they printed, The Tattler, was for the African-American community in Dayton, Ohio.
  • They decided who would fly first with a toss of a coin. Wilbur won the toss, but his first attempt failed. Orville went second and managed to fly for 12 seconds. 
  • They were autodidacts which is a person who has learned a subject without the benefit of a teacher or formal education; a self-taught person.
  • When Neil Armstrong went to the moon he paid homage to the Wright brothers by carrying both a swatch of fabric from the 1903 Flyer’s left wing and a piece of its wooden propeller inside his spacesuit.
  • The Wright brothers were proud Midwesterner that spent their formative years in Dayton, Ohio. Later in life, Wilbur said his advice for those seeking success would be to “pick out a good father and mother, and begin life in Ohio.”
  • Neither of the Wright brothers graduated from high school, but they were undoubtedly bright, neither of them ever earned their high school diploma. Wilbur became reclusive after suffering a bad hockey injury, and Orville dropped out of school.
  • They achieved four successful flights with their first airplane design… The Wright brothers started testing various wing designs and spent the next few years perfecting their evolving vision for a heavier-than-air flying machine.
  • On Dec. 17, 1903, the brothers successfully launch the world’s first airplane. The Wright Flyer I. It was made of spruce and had propellers and a specially designed engine cast mainly from lightweight aluminum. It was the first controlled and powered flying machine that could fly with the weight of humans. From this design, the modern airplane was born.
  • The Wright Flyer I cost about $1000 to make.
  • The Wright brothers only flew together once (though both piloted the planes individually); on May 25, 1910, they took a six-minute flight piloted by Orville with Wilbur as his passenger.
  •  On that same day in May, Orville took his 82-year-old father, Milton, on a seven-minute flight. They flew at a height of about 350 feet.
  • The Wright Brothers made life-sized copies of their beloved helicopter toy with the intention of making an aircraft that would hold them both.
  • The press initially ignored the Kitty Hawk flights, despite their monumental achievement, the Dayton Journal didn’t think the Wright brothers’ short flights were important enough to cover. The Virginia Pilot ended up catching wind of the story, however, and they printed an error-ridden account that was picked up by several other papers. Eventually, the Dayton Journal wrote up an official and accurate story.
  • The Wright brothers established the world’s first test flight facilities (which is now known as Wright Patterson Air Force Base) near Dayton, Ohio. 
  • Ohio and North Carolina often battle over which state is truly the “birthplace of aviation.”

Thank you for stopping by, Enjoy the rest of your day and I will see you all back here next week!

Emily Dickinson

Hi everyone, today’s post is about the American Poet Emily Dickinson. She was born on this day, one hundred and ninety years ago today. Emily was more renowned for her poetry after her death than when she was alive.

Early Life

Emily as a Child

Born Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, (December 10, 1830), to parents Edward Dickinson (politician), and Emily Norcross Dickinson (poet), in Amherst, Massachusetts, she was born into a literate and very respectable family. Emily is the second of three children, and she grew-up living a moderately privileged life with strong religious beliefs. For the first nine years of her life she lived in a mansion built by her paternal grandfather Samuel Fowler Dickinson who helped found the Amherst College, but then everything took a drastic turn and they went bankrupt shortly before her birth.

Her father Edward Dickinson was a forceful Whig lawyer and trustee of Amherst College, her mother Emily Norcross Dickinson was a former student of ‘Monson Academy’ and an introverted wife and hardworking housekeeper. Emily was named after her mother and lived with her parents and two siblings her elder brother William Austin Dickinson (known as Austin), and her younger sister, Lavinia Norcross Dickinson (known as Vinnie) at their homestead. Her parents were loving but stern, Emily didn’t get along with her parents but she did become very close to Austin and Vinnie.

 The family moved to Pleasant Street after the birth of Lavinia in order to accommodate for Edwards prospering political career as well as his legal career that provided a bigger house for his children, and to provide his children with a refined education. The education catered to Emily which was not one that was provided to girls during the Victorian age. She received a classical education that only the elite few could afford.

Emily and her siblings – L-R: Emily, William and Lavinia

Dickinson went to primary school in Amherst before she attended the co-educational Amherst Academy, where teachers and students alike saw her extraordinary abilities in composition. Along with being brilliant and observant. She showed a keen interest in the piano and domestic chores, especially in gardening, she also excelled in other subjects that was encouraged by the school, most notably Latin and sciences.

After having seven years at Amherst Academy (1840), she then went onto Mount Holyoke female seminary (1847). This was her first and longest time that she had spent away from her family. Emily made friends easily and acquired plenty of female friends as a young girl, some of them were Emily Fowler, Abby Wood, Jane Humphrey, Abiah Root, Susan Gilbert (who later went on to marry her brother William) and her cousin Sophia Holland. She also had a couple of male friends Benjamin Newton and Henry Vaughn Emmons. The only affection she had for them was purely platonic, nothing went beyond the boundaries of friendship.

There was a sudden turn of events, when Emily was hit by the sudden death of her beloved cousin Sophia Holland; she was so overwhelmed and shaken up by grief over the loss of Sophia that she was sent away to Boston to recover from the trauma. It was the death of Sophia that bought up many questions of death and mortality to a young Emily, and the fact that her garden at the back of the house was opposite the cemetery, which added to her morbid fascination with death. It was presumed that it was the loss of her loved ones that inflicted her with the most pain and which she would later sit down and pen several poems.

Emily’s House/Museum

Facts:

  • Her Father was a Senate for the United States.
  • The Dickinson family were devout Calvinists.
  • Emily Dickinson’s passion in her early years was botany, and it was because of her love of plants that she wanted to know the science of plant life.
  • The sisters never married and remained at home, there brother who was the only one that married, moved into the house next door with his wife.
  • Benjamin Franklin Newton, a student of her fathers, and had tutored her, introduce her to the works of William Wordsworth and Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Emily wrote a letter to her brother expressing on her growing interest and desire to write. She also wrote telling him on how different she felt.
  • Between the years of 1858 to 1865 saw her work take a steady leap, she based her writings on a few themes, such as nature and flora: some ballads, gospel, death and mortality
  • Her family moved back to the homestead, where her brother married Susan and had three children.
  • From an early age Emily Dickinson chose to restrict her social engagements as she retreated from society and became a recluse. In her late twenties she chose to stay within her family home for the vast majority of the time instead of venturing out into the world around her. She rarely travelled and based her perceptions of her friends on their ability to write a letter back to her.
  • Emily had wrote 1,000 poems by the time she was 35, which she categorized into manuscripts, and around 50 poems were sent to the chief editor of ‘Springfield Republican Samuel Bowles, which he published only a few anonymously in his journal.
  • Only 10 poems were actually published in her lifetime. The poems that were published during her lifetime were mainly done so anonymously or without her consent.
  • Emily Dickinson’s work was mostly published after her death.  Her sister Lavinia retrieved the bulk of her works when the poet had died. On per Emily’s request Lavinia burnt most of her letters but she recognized the worth of her poems and rather than burn them she wanted the world to recognize and applaud her sister’s works.
  • Dickinson’s health began to deteriorate after the untimely death of her youngest nephew in 1883. She became extremely fragile and became bedridden, but even during her illness she would continue to write.
  • Aged just 55, on May 15, 1886, Emily died of a kidney disorder called ‘Bright’s Disease’. As per her last wish, she was carried through a blooming field of buttercups to her burial site, where her coffin was laid in the family cemetery.
  • Emily’s herbarium, consists of 66 pages of special plant species from her garden is now preserved at Harvard University. The special collections of Amherst College also contains the original portrait and locks of the great poet.
  • Because of the wide heritage that stood in the ‘Homestead’ especially contributing to the proliferous work of Emily Dickinson, the mansion has now been preserved as a museum.
  • The ‘Amherst College’ also purchased the house of William and Susan Dickinson, called ‘Evergreens’ and converted it into a museum open to tours and renamed it the ‘Emily Dickinson Museum’.

Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,
And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.
I’ve heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.

Thankyou for taking the time to read my blog. See you all next week.

54 Christmas Quotes For Everyone!

Hi everyone, well the Christmas season is fast approaching. Trees are being decorated and decorations are being put up around the house and by now the shops will be bustling with eager customers trying to find the perfect gift for that someone special, while others have done most of their shopping online this year. I find that: ‘yes’ you can get pretty much anything online, and ‘yes’ it saves hours upon hours trawling around endless shops but it doesn’t give you the same satisfaction or that personal touch of going from shop to shop and actually looking for that little something you know they will love. I hope that when you are out and about that you remain safe and sound.

I thought that I would do Christmas quotes this week, as we are now in December and a lead up to Christmas. Just to get you into the festive season. Three weeks today to be exact, it will be Christmas Eve.

Something For Everyone…

  • “Christmas… is not an external event at all, but a piece of one’s home that one carries in one’s heart.” Freya Stark
  •  “Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful.” Norman Vincent Peale
  • “It is Christmas in the heart that puts Christmas in the air.”  W. T. Ellis
  • “The magic of Christmas never ends and its greatest of gifts are family and friends,” Unknown
  • “Christmas is the day that holds all time together.” Alexander Smith
  •  “Gifts of time and love are surely the basic ingredients of a truly merry Christmas.” Peg Bracken.
  • “At Christmas, all roads lead home.” Marjorie Holmes
  • “Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house not a creature was stirring – not even a mouse: The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, in hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.” Clement C. Moore
  •  “It comes every year and will go on forever. And along with Christmas belong the keepsakes and the customs. Those humble, everyday things a mother clings to, and ponders, like Mary in the secret spaces of her heart.” Marjorie Holmes 
  • “Christmas is doing a little something extra for someone.” Charles Schulz
  •  “One of the most glorious messes in the world is the mess created in the living room on Christmas day. Don’t clean it up too quickly.” Andy Rooney
  • “The best of all gifts around any Christmas tree:  the presence of a happy family all wrapped up in each other.” Burton Hillis 
  • “Never worry about the size of your Christmas tree.  In the eyes of children, they are all 30 feet tall.” Larry Wilde 
  • “What is Christmas? It is tenderness for the past, courage for the present, hope for the future. It is a fervent wish that every cup may overflow with blessings rich and eternal, and that every path may lead to peace.” Agnes M. Pharo 
  • “Christmas is not as much about opening our presents as opening our hearts.” Janice Maeditere 

Funny Christmas Quotes

  • “Christmas is a baby shower that went totally overboard.” Andy Borowitz
  • “My husband’s idea of getting the Christmas spirit is to become Scrooge.” Melanie White
  • “Keep your friends close, your enemies closer, and receipts for all major purchases.”  Bridger Winegar
  • “He who has not Christmas in his heart will never find it under a tree.” Roy L. Smith
  •  “At Christmas, tea is compulsory. Relatives are optional.” Robert Godden
  • “What I like about Christmas is that you can make people forget the past with the present.” Don Marquis
  • “I love Christmas. I receive a lot of wonderful presents I can’t wait to exchange.” Henny Youngman
  • “Never worry about the size of your Christmas tree. In the eyes of children, they are all 30 feet tall.” Larry Wilde
  • “Who’s the bane of Santa’s life? The elf and safety officer.” Catherine Tate
  • “Mail your packages early so the post office can lose them in time for Christmas.” – Johnny Carson
  • “Three phrases that sum up Christmas are: Peace on Earth, Goodwill to Men, and Batteries not included.” – Author Unknown
  •  “I left Santa gluten-free cookies and organic soy milk and he put a solar panel in my stocking.”– Unknown
  • “If you can’t wrap Christmas presents well, at least make it look like they put up a good fight.”– Author Unknown
  • “Christmas is a magical time of year… I just watched all my money magically disappear.”– Unknown
  • “My mother-in-law has come round to our house at Christmas seven years running. This year we’re having a change. We’re going to let her in.”– Leslie ‘Les’ Dawson, Jr.
  • “Anyone who believes that men are the equal of women has never seen a man trying to wrap a Christmas present.” – Unknown
  •  “The best Christmas present I got from my husband was a week to do whatever I wanted.”– Olivia Haigh Williams

Christmas Movie Quotes

  • “Maybe Christmas,” he thought, “doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas… perhaps… means a little bit more.” How The Grinch Stole Christmas.
  • “The best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear.” Elf
  • “Look, Daddy. Teacher says every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings.” it’s A Wonderful Life 
  •  “Some people are worth melting for. Just maybe not right this second.” Frozen
  • “Charlie, stay away from those things. They’re reindeer, you don’t know where they’ve been. They all look like they’ve got key lime disease.” The Santa Clause
  • “I need some peace and quiet…or whatever it is people go away for.” The Holiday
  • “We’re your worst nightmare. Elves with attitude.” The Santa Clause
  • “How can you give Kris Kringle a parking ticket on Christmas Eve? What’s next, rabies shots for the Easter Bunny?” Home Alone
  •  “One can never have enough socks. Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn’t get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.” Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  • “What happened to the hickory honey ham?” Christmas with the Kranks
  • “Oh, I love it. It’s so cute. It like a little baby unicorn.” Frozen
  • “If you see a sign that says ‘Peep Show’, that doesn’t mean they’re letting you look at presents before Christmas.” Elf

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog. Keep safe, and I will see you all next week!

15 Fantasy Films of 2020

Hi everyone, I hope your all doing okay. This week’s post is about fantasy movies of 2020. There are two genre’s that I do love and that is Comedy and Fantasy. I find that laughter can get you through anything which is why comedy is a big part of my life.

I have been a big of fan of everything to do with Fantasy, since I was little girl whether it be books, movies or tv shows. For me, it is a way of escaping. even if it is for a couple of hours, you need it more than ever with everything that’s going on in the world you need that bit of escape, some way to relieve the pressure.

Movies To Watch…

Here is a look at what came out in 2020 and a couple of movies still to come out. Some you may of seen, whilst others you have been dying to watch. Anyway whatever the case maybe, I hope these might entice you to take a look at them. Enjoy!

Artemis Fowl

Artemis Fowl is a 12-year-old genius and descendant of a long line of criminal masterminds. He soon finds himself in an epic battle against a race of powerful underground fairies who may be behind his father’s disappearance.

Director: Kenneth Branagh

Writers: Conor McPherson (screenplay by), Eoin Colfer (based on the novel by)

Stars: Ferdia Shaw, Lara McDonnell, Josh Gad

Dolittle

Dr. John Dolittle lives in solitude behind the high walls of his lush manor in 19th-century England. His only companionship comes from an array of exotic animals that he speaks to daily. But when young Queen Victoria becomes gravely ill, the eccentric doctor and his furry friends embark on an epic adventure to a mythical island to find the cure.

Director: Stephen Gaghan

Writers: Stephen Gaghan (screenplay by), Dan Gregor (screenplay by)

Stars: Robert Downey Jr., Antonio Banderas, Michael Sheen

DragonHeart Vengeance

Lukas, a young farmer whose family is killed by savage raiders in the countryside, sets out on an epic quest for revenge, forming an unlikely trio with a majestic dragon and a swashbuckling, sword-fighting mercenary, Darius.

Director: Ivan Silvestrini

Writers: Matthew Feitshans, Patrick Read Johnson (based on characters created by)

Stars: Helena Bonham Carter, Joseph Millson, Jack Kane |

Fantasy Island

The enigmatic Mr Roarke makes the secret dreams of his lucky guests come true at a luxurious but remote tropical resort, but when the fantasies turn into nightmares, the guests have to solve the island’s mystery in order to escape with their lives.

Director: Jeff Wadlow

Writers: Jillian Jacobs, Christopher Roach

Stars: Michael Peña, Maggie Q, Lucy Hale

Four Kids and It

Two families each heading to the same coastal beauty spot in Cornwall, with four children unaware their lives are about to converge. Single mum Alice and single dad David are dating, and they have decided to reveal that to their kids during a seaside holiday. The Kids soon meet a magical creature on the beach with the power to grant wishes, but when they start making wishes it causes all kinds of mayhem.

Director: Andy De Emmony

Writers: Simon Lewis, Mark Oswin (additional writing)

Stars: Teddie-Rose Malleson-Allen, Pippa Haywood, Matthew Goode

Magic Camp

A straight-laced banker returns to magic camp, which he attended years ago as a boy, to work as a compassionate and fun-loving counsellor while also keeping his eye on winning first place in the upcoming Golden Wand competition.

Director: Mark Waters

Writers: Micah Fitzerman-Blue (screenplay by), Noah Harpster (screenplay by)

Stars: Adam Devine, Jeffrey Tambor, Gillian Jacobs

Mortal

Fantasy adventure origin story about a young man discovering he has God-like powers based on ancient Norwegian mythology.

Director: André Øvredal

Writers: Geoff Bussetil, Norman Lesperance

Stars: Nat Wolff, Priyanka Bose, Iben Akerlie

Onward

Teenage elf brothers Ian and Barley embark on a magical quest to spend one more day with their late father. Like any good adventure, their journey is filled with cryptic maps, impossible obstacles, and unimaginable discoveries. But when dear Mom finds out her sons are missing; she teams up with the legendary manticore to bring her beloved boys back home.

Director: Dan Scanlon

Writers: Dan Scanlon (original story by), Keith Bunin (original story by)

Stars: Tom Holland, Chris Pratt, Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The King’s Daughter

Completed. King Louis XIV’s quest for immortality leads him to capture and steal a mermaid’s life force, a move that is further complicated by his illegitimate daughter’s discovery of the creature

Director: Sean McNamara

Writers: Ronald Bass (screenplay), Barry Berman

Stars: Pierce Brosnan, William Hurt, Benjamin Walker

The Old Guard

A covert team of mercenaries, that are all centuries-old immortals, with the ability to heal themselves, are suddenly exposed and must now fight to keep their identity a secret, soon discover that someone is onto their secret and they must fight to protect their freedom.

Director: Gina Prince-Bythewood

Writers: Greg Rucka (screenplay by), Greg Rucka (based on the graphic novel series by)

Stars: Charlize Theron, KiKi Layne, Matthias Schoenaerts

Trolls World Tour

Poppy and Branch discover that there are six different troll tribes scattered over six different lands. Each tribe is also devoted to six different kinds of music — funk, country, techno, classical, pop and rock. When rockers Queen Barb and King Thrash set out to destroy the other music, Poppy and Branch embark on a daring mission to unite the trolls and save the diverse melodies from becoming extinct..

Directors: Walt Dohrn, David P. Smith (co-director)

Writers: Jonathan Aibel (screenplay by), Glenn Berger (screenplay by)

Stars: Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, Rachel Bloom

Wendy

Lost on a mysterious island where aging and time have come unglued, Wendy must fight to save her family, her freedom, and the joyous spirit of youth from the deadly peril of growing up.

Director: Benh Zeitlin

Writers: Benh Zeitlin, Eliza Zeitlin

Stars: Devin France, Yashua Mack, Gage Naquin

Movies Still to Come…

Release Date: October 19th 2020

Gretel & Hansel

When their mother descends into madness, siblings Gretel and Hansel must fend for themselves in the dark and unforgiving woods. Hungry and scared, they fortuitously stumble upon a bounty of food left outside an isolated home. Invited inside by the seemingly friendly owner, the children soon suspect that her generous but mysterious behaviour is part of a sinister plan to do them harm.

Director: Oz Perkins (as Osgood Perkins)

Writer: Rob Hayes

Stars: Sophia Lillis, Samuel Leakey, Alice Krige

Release Date: October 23rd 2020

The Secret Garden

When Mary Lennox’s parents suddenly die, she is sent to live with her uncle, Archibald Craven, on his remote country estate deep in the Yorkshire moors. While exploring, she discovers a hidden magical garden.

Director: Marc Munden

Writers: Jack Thorne (screenplay by), Frances Hodgson Burnett (novel)

Stars: Dixie Egerickx, Richard Hansell, David Verrey

Release Date: Dec 23rd 2020

Wonder Woman 84

Fast forward to the 1980s as Wonder Woman’s next big screen adventure finds her facing two all-new foes: Max Lord and The Cheetah.

Director: Patty Jenkins

Writers: Geoff Johns (story), Patty Jenkins

Stars: Pedro Pascal, Gal Gadot, Robin Wright

Thanks for taking time out to read my blog. Keep safe and I will see you back here next