Tag Archives: Facts

Emily Dickinson

Hi everyone, today’s post is about the American Poet Emily Dickinson. She was born on this day, one hundred and ninety years ago today. Emily was more renowned for her poetry after her death than when she was alive.

Early Life

Emily as a Child

Born Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, (December 10, 1830), to parents Edward Dickinson (politician), and Emily Norcross Dickinson (poet), in Amherst, Massachusetts, she was born into a literate and very respectable family. Emily is the second of three children, and she grew-up living a moderately privileged life with strong religious beliefs. For the first nine years of her life she lived in a mansion built by her paternal grandfather Samuel Fowler Dickinson who helped found the Amherst College, but then everything took a drastic turn and they went bankrupt shortly before her birth.

Her father Edward Dickinson was a forceful Whig lawyer and trustee of Amherst College, her mother Emily Norcross Dickinson was a former student of ‘Monson Academy’ and an introverted wife and hardworking housekeeper. Emily was named after her mother and lived with her parents and two siblings her elder brother William Austin Dickinson (known as Austin), and her younger sister, Lavinia Norcross Dickinson (known as Vinnie) at their homestead. Her parents were loving but stern, Emily didn’t get along with her parents but she did become very close to Austin and Vinnie.

 The family moved to Pleasant Street after the birth of Lavinia in order to accommodate for Edwards prospering political career as well as his legal career that provided a bigger house for his children, and to provide his children with a refined education. The education catered to Emily which was not one that was provided to girls during the Victorian age. She received a classical education that only the elite few could afford.

Emily and her siblings – L-R: Emily, William and Lavinia

Dickinson went to primary school in Amherst before she attended the co-educational Amherst Academy, where teachers and students alike saw her extraordinary abilities in composition. Along with being brilliant and observant. She showed a keen interest in the piano and domestic chores, especially in gardening, she also excelled in other subjects that was encouraged by the school, most notably Latin and sciences.

After having seven years at Amherst Academy (1840), she then went onto Mount Holyoke female seminary (1847). This was her first and longest time that she had spent away from her family. Emily made friends easily and acquired plenty of female friends as a young girl, some of them were Emily Fowler, Abby Wood, Jane Humphrey, Abiah Root, Susan Gilbert (who later went on to marry her brother William) and her cousin Sophia Holland. She also had a couple of male friends Benjamin Newton and Henry Vaughn Emmons. The only affection she had for them was purely platonic, nothing went beyond the boundaries of friendship.

There was a sudden turn of events, when Emily was hit by the sudden death of her beloved cousin Sophia Holland; she was so overwhelmed and shaken up by grief over the loss of Sophia that she was sent away to Boston to recover from the trauma. It was the death of Sophia that bought up many questions of death and mortality to a young Emily, and the fact that her garden at the back of the house was opposite the cemetery, which added to her morbid fascination with death. It was presumed that it was the loss of her loved ones that inflicted her with the most pain and which she would later sit down and pen several poems.

Emily’s House/Museum

Facts:

  • Her Father was a Senate for the United States.
  • The Dickinson family were devout Calvinists.
  • Emily Dickinson’s passion in her early years was botany, and it was because of her love of plants that she wanted to know the science of plant life.
  • The sisters never married and remained at home, there brother who was the only one that married, moved into the house next door with his wife.
  • Benjamin Franklin Newton, a student of her fathers, and had tutored her, introduce her to the works of William Wordsworth and Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Emily wrote a letter to her brother expressing on her growing interest and desire to write. She also wrote telling him on how different she felt.
  • Between the years of 1858 to 1865 saw her work take a steady leap, she based her writings on a few themes, such as nature and flora: some ballads, gospel, death and mortality
  • Her family moved back to the homestead, where her brother married Susan and had three children.
  • From an early age Emily Dickinson chose to restrict her social engagements as she retreated from society and became a recluse. In her late twenties she chose to stay within her family home for the vast majority of the time instead of venturing out into the world around her. She rarely travelled and based her perceptions of her friends on their ability to write a letter back to her.
  • Emily had wrote 1,000 poems by the time she was 35, which she categorized into manuscripts, and around 50 poems were sent to the chief editor of ‘Springfield Republican Samuel Bowles, which he published only a few anonymously in his journal.
  • Only 10 poems were actually published in her lifetime. The poems that were published during her lifetime were mainly done so anonymously or without her consent.
  • Emily Dickinson’s work was mostly published after her death.  Her sister Lavinia retrieved the bulk of her works when the poet had died. On per Emily’s request Lavinia burnt most of her letters but she recognized the worth of her poems and rather than burn them she wanted the world to recognize and applaud her sister’s works.
  • Dickinson’s health began to deteriorate after the untimely death of her youngest nephew in 1883. She became extremely fragile and became bedridden, but even during her illness she would continue to write.
  • Aged just 55, on May 15, 1886, Emily died of a kidney disorder called ‘Bright’s Disease’. As per her last wish, she was carried through a blooming field of buttercups to her burial site, where her coffin was laid in the family cemetery.
  • Emily’s herbarium, consists of 66 pages of special plant species from her garden is now preserved at Harvard University. The special collections of Amherst College also contains the original portrait and locks of the great poet.
  • Because of the wide heritage that stood in the ‘Homestead’ especially contributing to the proliferous work of Emily Dickinson, the mansion has now been preserved as a museum.
  • The ‘Amherst College’ also purchased the house of William and Susan Dickinson, called ‘Evergreens’ and converted it into a museum open to tours and renamed it the ‘Emily Dickinson Museum’.

Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,
And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.
I’ve heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.

Thankyou for taking the time to read my blog. See you all next week.

On This Day in Disney History

Hi everyone, I hope you are all staying well, and keeping safe too… I am one of those people that like to always keep myself busy, that way I can stay alert and sane especially in times like these. You need to make sure that you stay busy and active, not just your body, but your mind too, as like your body, your mind needs exercising, otherwise it will get lazy and sluggish. “An active mind cannot exist in an inactive body” George S. Patton Jnr.

Today’s post is about… On this day in Disney history. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t love Disney, let’s face it what’s not to love… So I wondered what could have happened in the world of Disney over the years on this day.

What Happened on This Day

1905:

Eleanor Audley, was the actress behind the voices of the evil Maleficent in Disney’s 1959 Sleeping Beauty, and Lady Tremaine in the 1950 Cinderella, was born in New York City. (On both films, animator Marc Davis created the characters’ facial features to resemble that of Audley). She also was the original voice of Madame Leota for the Haunted Mansion attraction. (Fans of the 1960s sitcom Green Acres may remember Audley for her role of Eunice, Oliver’s mother).

1906:

Imagineer and Disney Legend William Cottrell is born to English parents in South Bend, Indiana. His Disney credits include Pinocchio, The Reluctant Dragon, and Alice in Wonderland. Cottrell was the first president of what is today known as Walt Disney Imagineering! (He was also the brother-in-law of Lillian and Walt Disney).

“He (Cottrell) was a talented writer and helped shape how we referred to events and attractions at Disneyland. For instance, he encouraged us to quit using the term “ride” and to refer to attractions as an “experience,” which is exactly what they are – an experience.” -Imagineer John Hench

1919:

Character actor Alan Young was born Angus Young, in North Shields, Northumberland, England. He was the voice of Scrooge McDuck (a cartoon character created in 1947 by Carl Barks). For over 30 years. Young’s credits include “Mickey’s Christmas Carol,” “Mickey’s Twice upon a Christmas,” “The House of Mouse,” “Duck-Tales,” and many Disney television shows and video games. Young also appeared in the 1978 -action feature “The Cat From Outer Space” as Dr. Wenger and voiced toy maker Hiram Flaversham for the 1986 “The Great Mouse Detective.” TV fans will always remember him best as Wilbur Post from the classic 1960s sitcom “Mister Ed”. Alan Young passed at age 96 in May 2016.

1932:

Disney’s Silly Symphony cartoon Babes in the Woods was loosely based on the “Hansel and Gretel” story & the nursery rhyme “Babes in the Woods” is released. Directed by Bert Gillett, two lost children chance upon a village of elves but meet an evil spooky witch! Babes in the Woods is the third Silly Symphony produced in color.

1941:

The Disney cartoon Thrifty Pigs (made for the National Film Board of Canada) is delivered.

1959:

Actress Allison Janney, the voice of Peach in Disney/Pixar’s 2003 Finding Nemo, is born in Dayton, Ohio. She also supplied the voice of Charlene Doofenshmirtz on Disney Channel’s Phineas and Ferb. (Janney is best known for her role as C. J. Cregg on the television series The West Wing).

1961:

The NBC-TV series Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color airs part 2 of “The Light in the Forest.”

1962:

Academy Award-winning actress, director & producer Jodie Foster is born in Los Angeles, California. She made her feature film debut in Disney’s 1972 Napoleon and Samantha, playing the role of Samantha. Foster’s other 1970s Disney live-action credits include Candleshoe as Casey, in the original version of Freaky Friday as Annabel Andrews and One Little Indian as Martha. In 2005, she starred in Touchstone’s psychological thriller mystery Flightplan. Foster’s first started acting in commercials at age 3, and her first significant role was in the 1976 film Taxi Driver

1966:

Actor Jason Scott Lee, the voice of David Kawena in Disney’s 2002 Lilo & Stitch, is born in Oahu, Hawaii.

1971:

Walt Disney World’s new Fort Wilderness Resort and Campground, located at 4510 North Fort Wilderness Trail, opens in Florida. Built in the Magic Kingdom Resort Area, adjacent to Bay Lake and Disneys’ River Country (a now-defunct water park), Fort Wilderness is designed with a rustic theme.

1978:

A 90-minute television show air’s on The Wonderful World of Disney to celebrate Mickey Mouse’s 50th birthday. Guest appearances include Gerald Ford, Billy Graham, Lawrence Welk, Willie Nelson, Gene Kelly, Roy Rogers & Dale Evans, Edgar Bergen, Jodie Foster, Goldie Hawn, Eva Gabor, Anne Bancroft, Jo Anne Worley, and Johnny Carson.

Animator, writer, director, and producer Daniel Chong was born in Fargo, North Dakota. Beginning his career as a storyboard artist for numerous animation studios including Walt Disney Animation and Pixar, his film credits include Bolt (2008), Cars 2 (2011), and Inside Out (2015) and the television specials Toy Story of Terror! (2013) and Toy Story That Time Forgot (2014).

1983:

Actor Adam Driver is born in San Diego, California. He gained recognition for playing Kylo Ren in the Star Wars sequel trilogy films The Force Awakens (2015), The Last Jedi (2017), and The Rise of Skywalker (2019). 

1987:

Ben Clopton, an artist best known for his work on Walt Disney and Harman-Ising animated cartoons, passes away in Montana. Hired by Walt Disney in February 1927, he began working under animator Ub Iwerks as an in-betweener. His first cartoon was Alice’s Three Bad Eggs, but later assisted Iwerks in drawing the first Mickey Mouse cartoon, Plane Crazy. In spring 1927 Clopton left the Disney studio.

1989:

The Parent Trap IV: Hawaiian Honeymoon, the third and last made-for-TV sequel of The Parent Trap, debuts. Hayley Mills reprises her role as both Susan and Sharon.

1990:

Disney World’s Beach Club Resort can be found at 1800 Epcot Resorts Blvd, is now open. This deluxe Disney property takes after a luxurious Victorian Cape Cod Resort and features Stormalong Bay an enormous swimming pool. Also debuting in the hotel is the Atlantic Wear and Wardrobe Emporium Shop.

1996:

Disney Online officially launches its Internet Disney Store.

1998:

VH1 airs Hollywood & Vinyl: Disney’s 101 Greatest Musical Moments – a look back at musical moments in the history of Disney animated feature films from the last 75 years.

2000:

The Wonderful World of Disney airs the movie Santa Who? Starring Leslie Nielsen, for the very first time.

The made-for-television fantasy-comedy centres on Santa Claus (Nielsen) developing a case of amnesia right before Christmas. The cast includes Steven Eckholdt, Robyn Lively, Max Morrow, Aron Tager, and Tommy Davidson. Thinking him to be a homeless man, a news reporter named Peter Albright (Eckholdt) gets amnesiac Santa a job as a department store Santa and tries to find his family. Directed by William Dear, Santa Who? is distributed in the U.S. by Buena Vista Television.

This film marks the second of what will be three times where Leslie Nielsen plays Santa Claus. He played Santa in the 1991 film “All I Want for Christmas.” He will later play the jolly old elf in an episode of the 2003 animated TV series “Chilly Beach.”

2004:

Disneyland’s A Christmas Fantasy Parade returns for the holiday season.

Santa Goofy and Chip ‘n’ Dale visit shoppers at New York City’s World of Disney store.

Comic-actor Tim Allen, the voice of Buzz Lightyear and the star of The Santa Clause films and the ABC sitcom Home Improvement, receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Walt Disney Pictures releases National Treasure starring Nicholas Cage as a treasure hunter & historian on hot pursuit of a war chest hidden by the Founding Fathers after the American Revolutionary War. Directed by Jon Turteltaub and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, the films also stars Jon Voight, Justin Bartha, Diane Kruger, Sean Bean, Harvey Keitel, and Christopher Plummer. Cage plays Benjamin Franklin Gates, a historian and amateur cryptologist. National Treasure was filmed primarily in Washington, New York, Philadelphia and Utah. Most scenes were filmed on location, with the exceptions of the Independence Hall scene, which was filmed at a replica of Independence Hall at Knott’s Berry Farm.

2005:

The month-long Festival of the Seasons kicks off at the Downtown Disney Marketplace in Florida.

Disney’s stage musical Aida begins previews in Munich, Germany at the Deutsches Theatre. It will officially open November 22.

2007:

The Disney feature Enchanted has its U.S. premiere at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City. In attendance are members of the cast including Patrick Dempsey and Amy Adams, and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Earlier in the day, Dempsey and Adams visit MTV’s TRL, shot at MTV Studios in New York City’s Times Square.

2008:

Walt Disney Parks and Resorts breaks ground for its first family destination resort in Hawaii with a traditional Hawaiian blessing ceremony on its 21-acre oceanfront property, located at the Ko Olina Resort & Marina development on the western side of O’ahu. Scheduled to open in 2011, plans include 350 hotel rooms and 480 Disney Vacation Club timeshare villas.

2011:

Disney Cruise Line kicks off its holiday season on this day with the first of three Thanksgiving voyages. All three ships (Magic, Wonder and Dream) will offer traditional Turkey Day activities with feasts and football games broadcast live on the outdoor jumbo screens by the pools. Mickey, Minnie and friends will also appear in their Thanksgiving attire.

Mickey, Minnie and Disney take part in the Festival of Lights parade on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. The event, in its 20th year, brings out thousands of parade revellers to Michigan Avenue at Pioneer Court and kicks off the holiday shopping season.

Disney VoluntEARS celebrate National Family Volunteer Day by helping assemble 26,341 food boxes (421 tons of food) at the Orange County Food Bank (in California) for local seniors in need this holiday season.

2012:

Although scheduled for a grand debut on December 6, Magic Kingdom’s new Fantasyland expansion at Walt Disney World has a soft opening on this day.

2013:

At a special ceremony in Orlando, the Themed Entertainment Association (TEA) announces the winners of the 20th Thea Awards, recognizing excellence in the creation of extraordinary visitor experiences, attractions, exhibits and places. This year, Walt Disney Parks & Resorts receives three awards:

Mystic Manor at Hong Kong Disneyland for Outstanding Achievement.  

  • Enchanted Tales with Belle, part of New Fantasyland at Magic Kingdom Park, for Outstanding Achievement – Participatory Character Greeting.
  • Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room, currently celebrating its 50th anniversary at Disneyland park, receives the Thea Classic award.
  • Each of the winning projects will be recognized at the Thea Awards ceremony, a black-tie gala to be held April 5, 2014, at the Disneyland Hotel.

Diane Disney Miller, the elder and only biological daughter of Walt and Lillian Disney, passes away at the age of 79 at her home in Napa, California. Miller founded the Walt Disney

Family Museum, which opened in 2009 in San Francisco’s Presidio, as a tribute to her family’s legacy.

 “As the beloved daughter of Walt Disney and one of his inspirations for creating Disneyland, she holds a special place in the history of The Walt Disney Co. and in the hearts of fans everywhere.” – Disney CEO Robert A. Iger

Snow falls on Hollywood Boulevard as Disney premieres Frozen at the El Capitan Theatre, with guests carrying cups of hot chocolate past lit up pine trees, snow banks and ice sculptures. The animated musical revolves around princess Anna – Disney’s 12th princess, who must team with a mountain man and his sidekick reindeer to find her sister, the Snow Queen, and end an icy spell that has trapped a kingdom in an eternal winter. Frozen will debut November 27.

“Never Land Rescue” a DVD collection of Jake and the Never Land Pirates is released.It includes the episodes “Neverland Rescue” Full Length Adventure, “It’s a Pirate Picnic / The Key to Skull Rock,” “The Golden Twilight Treasure / Rock The Croc!,” “Jake and Sneaky Le Beak / Cubby the Brave,” and “Jake’s Special Delivery / Seahorse Saddle-Up!” Jake and the Never Land Pirates is a musical and interactive children’s animated television series shown on Disney Junior.

2016:

Moana: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack. the soundtrack to the 2016 Disney animated film Moana, is released by Walt Disney Records. It features songs written by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mark Mancina and Opetaia Foa’i, with lyrics in English, Samoan, Tokelauan, and Tuvalu. The two-disc deluxe edition includes the score, which was composed by Mancina, as well as demos, outtakes and instrumental karaoke tracks. 

2019:

Frozen stars Idina Menzel and Kristen Bell receive stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame simultaneously. The unveiling takes place at the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Argyle Ave, near the Pantages Theatre.

Disney+ is launched in Australia, New Zealand, and Puerto Rico.

Thankyou for stopping bye and taking the time to read my post. Stay well and especially keep yourselves safe. See you all next week!

20 Interesting Facts

Hi everyone, hope your all enjoying the sun when it does come out. well everything is slowly starting to get back to normal. I should say the ‘new’ normal, because what we once knew as normal as now gone, this is why I thought that I would do my blog on some interesting facts surrounding the UK, I will sometime soon do some facts on the rest of the world, so keep posted.

Interesting Facts on the UK

The English drink more tea than most other cultures in the world, even more than the Japanese. The Irish drink more tea than the English. 

George Floyd death: PG Tips and Yorkshire Tea express 'solidaritea ...

Winston Churchill was terrible at school, except in English composition and history. In fact, he failed twice at the entrance exams for the Royal Military College, before going on to become one of Britain’s most famous prime ministers! 

British road signs can be baffling. If you see the Red Ring of Death, it usually means No Vehicles except bicycles being pushed by pedestrians.  

Queen Elizabeth II is distantly related to Vlad the Impaler, the infamous Romanian ruler who gave rise to Dracula stories! 

Many medical and scientific terms come from Greek words. Words that start with ph – are usually of Greek origin! Think phobia, physical, philosophy etc. 

The “London Bridge is Falling Down” nursery rhyme may be over 1000 years old. It may also point to the many fires and collapses the bridge was prone to over the centuries, and take a dig at ‘my fair lady’ or Queen Eleanor who may not have made the best use of bridge revenues. 

King James I proposed one flag for the joining of Scottish and English crowns, and the King James’ Union Flag was designed, which is now known as the Union Jack.

The world’s shortest flight is only 47 seconds (in ideal weather) to 2 minutes long, between the Orkney Islands of Papa Westray and Westray.

Papa Westray | Orkney.com
Papa Westray Island

Sadly only 21 percent of local Welsh people can speak their native language, which is called the British tongue in English. This is ironic, since 98 percent of Britain’s population (derived from the oldest name for the British Islands) speak English.    

London Tube stations used to have a ‘stand on the right’ escalator rule until it was thankfully scrapped in 2015. 

The Scottish national animal is the Unicorn. Why a creature that doesn’t even exist? It appears that according to Scottish mythology, the Unicorn is the natural enemy of the Lion, the symbol that the English royal family adopted for itself.  

Pyjamas was actually an Indian Bengali word derived from Persian that came into the English language.  

King Henry VIII exploded in his coffin, and his remains were ‘licked up by dog’ as was bravely predicted by Friar Peto. He was not the only exploding king of England, however. William the Conqueror was the other. 

The Bank of England that we know today was founded in 1694.

The Bank of England can and should do more to encourage lending ...
Bank of England

The British Royal Family is not just an icon of tradition (and fashion). Only when the Queen gives her ‘Royal Assent’ on a bill and signs it, can it become an act. Interestingly, Royal Assent has not been refused since 1707.  

The oldest building in Britain today is at Skara Brae, in the Orkney Isles of Scotland

It is not surprising that ‘salsa’ comes from Spanish, but did you know, so did ‘tornado’?   

Rural houses in Welsh village of Llanfairpwllgwyngyll with the altered name of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch which holds one of the longest names of any place in the world.  

In the 1600s, London was separate from Westminster but then rich people built houses on the Thames between the two cities.

The nursery rhyme Mary had a little lamb was based on Mary Sawyer, an 11-year-old Bostonian girl, whose lamb followed her to school one day in 1817. but she never wrote the poem,

In Scotland, if you get drunk and have a cow in your charge, for some reason you could be jailed or fined up to 200 pounds. 

Thank you for taking the time to read my post. See you all next week!

Ian Fleming

Hi everyone today’s post is on Ian Fleming, a man that had lead an extraordinary life, which you will find out further down the page.

Bio

On 28th May 1908 Ian Lancaster Fleming was born to Major Valentino Fleming DSO who was a British Conservative Member of Parliament and Evelyn Beatrice Sainte Croix Rose (known as Evelyn Fleming) was an English socialite.

“I am a poet in deeds–not often in words”

Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming was an English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer, and he is more well-known for his James Bond franchise of spy novels. Fleming comes from a very wealthy family that is connected to merchant bank Robert Fleming & Co, His father was a Member of Parliament for Henley from 1910 until his death on the Western Frontier in 1917.

“The distance between insanity and genius is measured only by success.”

Ian Fleming

Ian was well educated in top schools like Eton, Sandhurst, and Universities in Munich and Geneva. Once he had finished school he drifted in and out of jobs for a while, before he started on his writing path to success.

During the second world war he worked for the Navel Intelligence Division it was there he was planning Operation Goldeneye. His time spent as a journalist and also his time served in the war, provided him much detail for the background and depth for his James Bond novels

“Everything I write has a precedent in truth”

Ian Fleming

Interesting Facts about Ian Fleming

Here you get to read some facts, looking back throughout his life. Some you may know, and some might surprise you.

  • His middle name Lancaster was given to him, because his mother liked to claim she was a decent from John of Gaunt. The Duke of Lancaster and son of Edward III.
  • Ian didn’t excel as a scholar, but was champion twice of athletics.
  • At 17 he went to the Royal Military Academy of Sandhurst. His tutor at Eton had declared that he would make a good soldier.
  • From an early age, he was an avid book collector, ending up with a large collection of first editions.
  • The last book Ian Fleming wrote was Chitty Chitty, Bang, Bang, which he had written for his son Caspar.
  • His first job came in 1931 with the Press Agency Reuters. He would later go on to say it taught him to write fast and more accurately.

“There is only one recipe for a best seller and it is a very simple one. You have to get the reader to turn the page”

Ian Fleming
  • In 1939, The Director of the Naval Intelligence, recruited him as his personal assistant
  • He honed his skills and became an espionage planner.
  • He joined the Sunday Times when the war was over, and went on to be an accomplish travel writer, where his articles were eventually being published in book form.
  • Once he had returned back to journalism, he also acquired a plot of land in Jamaica, there he built Goldeneye, the perfect hideaway to write, and where he would go on to write the Bond novels.
  • He named his house after both a wartime operation and Carson McCullers’ novel Reflection in a Golden Eye.
  • The owner Chris Blackwell as now converted Goldeneye it into an exclusive holiday resort.

“Never say ‘no’ to adventures. Always say ‘yes,’ otherwise you’ll lead a very dull life.”

Ian Fleming
  • “M” was partly based on Flemings boss at the Naval Intelligence, but he also use to refer to his mother as “M.”
  • James Bond’s codename 007, stems from his Admiralty days, when all top secret communications was used as a double-zero prefix
  • The name of Miss Moneypenny came from a character in an unfinished novel by his older brother Peter Flemming.
  • Fleming’s leisure interests included cars, golf and snorkeling.
  • In 1952 he married Ann Charteris, the once former wife of Viscount Rothermere, the newspaper magnate. Noel Coward was a witness.
  • Following an attack of pleurisy, Fleming died of a heart attack on 12 August 1964. He was just 56.

“History is moving pretty quickly these days and the heroes and villains keep on changing parts.”

Ian Fleming

James Bond Quotes:

Here are some famous quotes from some of his movies.

  • “A martini. Shaken, not stirred.” —Sean Connery, Goldfinger
  • “My dear girl, there are some things that just aren’t done. Such as, drinking Dom Perignon ’53 above the temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s just as bad as listening to the Beatles without earmuffs.” —Sean Connery, Goldfinger
  • (After shooting a villain with a spear): “I think he got the point.” —Sean Connery, Thunderball
  • “Pistols at dawn; it’s a little old-fashioned, isn’t it?” —Roger MooreThe Man With the Golden Gun
  • “All those feathers and he still can’t fly.” – Roger Moore, The Spy Who Loved Me
  • “Why is it that people who can’t take advice always insist on giving it?” —Daniel Craig, Casino Royale
  • (After nearly dying from poisoning): “I’m sorry. That last hand…nearly killed me.” —Daniel Craig, Casino Royale
  •  “This never happened to the other fellow.” – George Lazenby, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Thank you for stopping by and I will see you all next week.